Monday, June 19, 2017

7 Response Objectives for Fire Departments


Fire on a rainy day, by Canadian Pacific

The purpose of NFPA 1710 is to provide minimum criteria to address “the effectiveness and efficiency of career” fire department personnel and operations.  This standard outlines seven objectives that fire departments must meet.  Stations, staffing, and systems, of the department should be organized appropriately and work together to meet these objectives.

  1. Alarm handling time.
  2. Turnout time.
  3. First unit on-scene time.
  4. Time to full alarm assignment deployment.
  5. Travel to full alarm assignment deployment at high-rise incidents.
  6. Time for AED on-scene.
  7. Time to arrival of ALS unit.

Alarm handling time. At least ninety-five percent of alarms must be answered within 15 seconds, and no more than 40 seconds for ninety-nine percent of alarms.  Alarm answering time is the length of time from the alarm being received at the communications center to the time that it is acknowledged.

Turnout time. Eighty seconds for fire and special operations, and sixty seconds for EMS. Turnout time is the time between  when the fire station receives an alarm and units go ‘en-route’, begin traveling to the scene.

First unit on-scene time. The first engine shall arrive at a fire scene within 4 minutes.

Time to full alarm assignment deployment. A full alarm assignment is to be deployed on the fire scene within 8 minutes.

Time to full alarm assignment at high-rise incidents.  A full alarm assignment is to be deployed on a high-rise fire scene within 10 minutes (610 seconds).

Time for AED on-scene. A first responder with AED (automatic external defibrillator) shall be on-scene at any emergency medical incident within 4 minutes.

Time to arrival of ALS unit. For departments that provide advanced life support (ALS) services, an ALS unit is to be on-scene at all emergency medical incidents within 8 minutes.


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